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Morning Mindset with Paul G. Markel


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Jun 25, 2018

You can take advantage of the American Dream and be a part of American Exceptionalism.


Episode Transcription

[INTRO]

♫ Trenches by Pop Evil ♫

*Alex*

Welcome to Morning Mindset. A daily dose of practical wit and wisdom with a professional educator & trainer, Amazon best selling author, United States Marine, Television and Radio host, Paul G. Markel. Each episode will focus on positive and productive ways to strengthen your mindset, and help you improve your relationships, career goals, and overall well-being. Please welcome your host; Paul G. Markel. 


*Professor Paul*

Hello and welcome back to Morning Mindset. Yes, we are back with brand new episodes. I hope that everyone out there, that is a regular listener, took the time to catch up on any previous episodes that they had not listened to, or maybe listen to some old ones and you know did some replays and reinforce what you'd already thought. But we're going to do some fresh ones now.

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We're closing in on, oh, look at that. According to my show note this is number 94. We're closing in on 100 Morning Mindsets, and my producer Zachary said that he's going to do something special for the 100th Episode, so keep an eye out for that. Now I was on the road and it gave me the opportunity to reload my quiver of topics to speak on, on Morning Mindset.

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One of the things that really struck a struck a chord with me, or stood out, was the examples of American Exceptionalism on Display. We went and visited many of our friends and partners. We have another show as many of you know, I went and visited a number of my friends and partners and and a lot of fans and listeners as well.

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By the time we got to the end, I had an opportunity to, well we had a lot of time in the car. Hours upon hours upon hours of driving here and there, and it gave me the opportunity to think, and what I saw was American Exceptionalism or the “American Dream” on display. How often do we hear that anymore or talk about it or discuss it or how often is American Exceptionalism promoted and endorsed by the people in our state capitals and our nation's capital that are supposed to be our leaders?

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They're supposed to be our leaders, they're supposed to inspire us. I don't see that anymore, I don't see that coming from the state capitals or from the nation's capital. I don't see people who are supposed to be leaders going out and extolling the virtues of the American Dream and American exceptionalism.

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What I see is exactly the opposite, and what I wanted to talk about today is American exceptionalism from the aspect of “you never know what you're going to accomplish until you've accomplished it”, and many times people won't know what they have accomplished until they're gone, until they've gone to their great reward.

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One of the companies that uh, we stopped and talked to was founded by what would now be the grandfather of the current president of the company. His grandfather founded the company in 1939. He started, he saw a need or what he perceived to be a need, and he came up with an idea and he started it. Started a business ran it out of his basement. His wife did the books and for years. It was a one-man operation.

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But it grew and he took risks he moved out of the basement rented a storefront and anytime you rent a business front, anytime you rent business property. It's a risk because you don't know if you're going to succeed, you don't know if you're going to be able to pay the bills. You know, if business all of a sudden is off or you lose business or there's a downturn in the economy or whatever.

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The people who are leasing you the the business property and your uh, your creditors, they don't care that the economy is down. They still want their money. So it's a risk. But this gentleman he took a risk, and before you know it he was hiring one employee in two and three and four, his oldest son when he was ready to retire took over the business and grew it and expanded it.

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And then his son which would be the grandson of the founder, he took over from his dad and now in 2018 we're talkin about a company that employs over 400 people in a small community in Iowa. That's a pretty big deal. You know, if you're in New York City or if you're in you know LA or you're in Chicago or whatever and you say “Oh that business, you know employees 400 people. That's not that big of an impact on the community” or at least you don't see it as one.

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But when you're in a small Iowa town, 400 people in that town are employed by this business. It's a big deal, and why are 400 people able to get up every day and go to a job that they enjoy and that, you know appreciates them? They're able to do that because one guy had an idea, he was inspired, and he started in his basement.

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There's another one that uh, we visited and the companies is only about 10-11 years old now. But it was a similar situation, the founder had an idea. He saw he perceived a problem, he saw a hole in the market and no one was filling that hole and so he decided that he was going to fill that hole. He was going to come up with a solution and he started at a workbench in his garage and he went out and he tinkered and he came up with an idea and he refined the idea and he changed the idea and he modified.

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Then he came up he came up against a uh, what a lot of people do when they start turning their hobbies into businesses. He had a full-time job, and he was also turning his hobby into a full-time job, and he I talked to him and he sat down with his wife, and they had to make a decision. He said “Hey, I really think that I'm on to something here. I really think that I can do something with this business. But I can't do both I can't do both anymore. I can't work my normal full-time job and do this. I just don't have enough hours in the day. I don't have enough energy in my body” and they prayed on it and he said, “You know, we had that kitchen table discussion” and it's scary.

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Because people like to be comfortable you like to be comfortable. I like to be comfortable, everyone likes to have comfort and security, and you have maybe you have a full-time job that it isn't, you know, it's not your dream job. It's not fantastic. It's not what you you thought you'd be doing when you're 14 years old or 18 years old, but but it's a job and you get to go there every day and it's pretty steady.

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But you have this dream this idea, and you realize that in order to make that come true, you're not going to be able to have the time to do the full time job. Now, it's a risk. What if you decide to reach out and turn that hobby or that dream or desire into a job? You decide you want to do that and it fails, or there's that that always that looming Shadow over your head like what if if I leave this good job, and I pursue this and it doesn't work. Well, then I'm screwed. Then I'm in trouble.

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You have to take a risk and most people or at least many people won't do that. They won't take the risk and that's fine. But in the examples that I saw I saw people that took risks and not only did it benefit them, it didn't just benefit them. It benefited all those around them. In the current topic that I'm talkin about, a guy out in his garage that business has grown now and they have 40 full-time employees. So went in 10 years, it went from one guy sitting in his garage doing everything himself, to now a business that employs 40 full-time employees. And this is another small business in Missouri.

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In a small town relatively small town. So 40 people now have their livelihood, because of the idea that one person had and the motivation they had and the risks that they took. The emotional risks, and the financial risks that they took, to do that and ladies and gentlemen, that really is the American dream.

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That is American exceptionalism. It's creating something that is going to grow even larger than you ever thought it was going to be. I think a lot of these if you ask the founders of these companies and they said “Man, if I could grow this company big enough to hire two or three people, if I could grow this company big enough so that it would pay for you know, my living my my individual salary that would be great.”

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But these people these Americans they took this opportunity. They took the opportunity that they had because they live in the United States of America, and they did something with it, and what they got, what they ended up with was an idea and a reality that was Far bigger than they ever thought that they could have. So I know many of you may be out there and you may be motivated. You may have an idea you may have something that you're really passionate about.

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You think well, you know, if I do this it may not work out. No, it might not work out it how many times we talked about we talked about Edison and we talked about uh, uh, Franco Ben Franklin and Thomas Edison and all these guys that you know, they failed 20-30-40-50 times. I think Edison, uh, historically had over 50, maybe it was a 100 failed attempts before he succeeded.

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Don't be afraid to fail. Don't be afraid to take a risk. Don't be afraid to have faith and you may turn that American Dream into genuine American exceptionalism. I just wanted to take a moment and share that with you because I think it's important, because not everybody's talking about that today.

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Most people are talking about. Well, you need to you need to have a safety net. You need to make sure that you know that if you fail the government will bail bail you out and yada yada now that's not what America is all about. America is about individual citizens having dreams and ideas and motivation, taking risks, working. If you want to uh, if you want to work a 40-hour a week job go ahead and work for somebody else, if you want to work a 62 an 80 hour week job. Go ahead and work for yourself.

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All right, ladies and gentlemen, thank you. I'm glad to be back behind this microphone. I'm glad that you're back listening. I am your host Paul Markel, and I will talk to you again, real soon.


[OUTRO]

♫ Trenches by Pop Evil ♫

*Alex*

Thank you for spending time with us today. To get show notes, submit a topic request, for more from your host Paul G. Markel, visit MorningMindsetPodcast.com. That’s MorningMindsetPodcast.com. Please leave a review of this podcast on your favorite podcast player, we appreciate your time & effort, and we look forward to reading your honest feedback.